Three Thoughts No1

by | Jul 21, 2015

Each week we round up some of the best posts we’ve read that we think you might find useful. We pick posts that will spark ideas you can put into practice.

Why not share your thoughts or favourite posts in the comments below?

No.1 You don’t know what you don’t know – how our unconscious minds undermine the workplace

  • Leadership
  • Psychology
  • Innovation

What?

Our brains don’t always work as logically as we think, we take shortcuts without realising. This post from Google’s Laszlo Block (SVP of People Operations) highlights some of the ways unconscious bias affect us in the workplace.

Why?

Our understanding of how we think has come along way in the past 15 years, but not little of this thinking has filtered through to the workplace yet. Behavioural economics is a field we’re very interested in and think you should be too, because it has a huge impact on how we make decisions and how we influence people around us.

Read the full post

No.2 How to manage your former peers

alone with your thoughts
  • Leadership
  • Practical tips
  • New managers

What?

This Harvard Business Review article highlights some great advice for anyone making that tricky transition from “one of the gang” to “leader of the pack”.

Why?

One day you’re on an equal footing, the next you’re in charge. That’s never an easy transition to make, especially if you end up managing a person who was going for the promotion you’ve just won. It’s something we find people in our leadership programmes often find challenging. So check out these tips and share them with anyone you know in this position.

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No.3 Sir Dave Brailsford – CORE Principle and Marginal Gains

  • Data savvy
  • Psychology
  • Innovation

What?

This is an insightful video of Sir Dave Brailsford talking about two of the foundations of the success of British cycling over the past five years. CORE stands for: Commitment Ownership Responsibility and Excellence. Marginal gains are the small improvements that you can make, which on their own don’t appear to be of great value, but when you make lots of them, the cumulative effect is great.

Why?

These models are really useful ways to start thinking about how you use metrics more effectively. Stop hitting people over the head with activity metrics and start using them intelligently to influence performance and link performance improvements to the key strategic goals of your business.

Watch the video